Light and Darkness – The Gospel of Philip Quote

Light and Darkness, life and death, right and left, are brothers of one another. They are inseparable. Because of this neither are the good good, nor evil evil, nor is life life, nor death death. For this reason each one will dissolve into its earliest origin. But those who are exalted above the world are indissoluble, eternal.

The Gospel of Philip, c. 3rd Century

Life is a Movement – Adyashanti Quote

Adyashanti

Life is a movement. And because life is a movement, it’s always flowing, it’s always changing. Something is always coming into existence and falling away from existence. Because that’s the nature of life, life really doesn’t lend itself to the final answers that our mind really, really likes. I think it’s better to not even think of it in terms of final answers but rather a response to the moment – a wise, clear, awakened, however you want to think about it – a loving response to the moment, or a response to your life. […] What’s the right response in one moment is not the right response in the next moment. This is of course the nature of life; that it’s impermanent. There’s nothing really to cling to or hold on to. It’s one of the, I think, more challenging lessons of life, not to cling, not to hold on to. We human beings have this tendency to hold onto almost everything.

The society is not happy with mature people — Osho Quote

The society is not happy with mature people. Mature people are dangerous people because a mature person lives according to his own being. He goes on doing his own thing—he does not bother about what people say, what their opinion is. He does not hanker for respectability, for prestige; he does not bother about honor. He lives his own life—he lives it at any cost. He is ready to sacrifice everything, but he is never ready to sacrifice his freedom. Society is afraid of these people; society wants everybody to remain
childish. Everybody should be kept at an age somewhere between seven and fourteen—and that’s where people are.

Osho: Maturity—The Responsibility of Being Oneself

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Bread from Heaven — Jesus Quote

[47]Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life.
[48]I am that bread of life.
[49]Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead.
[50]This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.
[51]I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.

John 6:47-51

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Polarity and Rhythm — Selvarajan Yesudian and Elisabeth Haich Quote

Simultaneously with the expansion of his consciousness, the pupil comes to the realisation that everything that lives in time and space is alive because it carries within itself polarity and rhythm. He begins to see the secrets of creation. In that moment when the creative principle leaves the absolute and splits in two, the negative and positive pole, i.e., polarity, is born. Between the two there arises a pulsating connection, rhythm is born, and there begins the manifestation of life.

Selvarajan Yesudian and Elisabeth Haich: Yoga and Health. Unwin, 1953

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Opposite Tensions — Heraclitus Quote

The attunement of the world is of opposite tensions, as is that of the harp and bow.

The road up and the road down is one and the same. The beginning and end are common.

That which is at variance with itself agrees with itself.

Cool things become warm, warm cools, moisture dries, the parched get wet. It scatters and gathers, it comes and goes.

Heraclitus (540–480)

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Evidence-Based Medicine — Abram Hoffer Quote

You might wonder what happened to evidence-based medicine, until you realize that to be accepted as evidence the work has to come from a prestigious institution like Harvard, has to be done by well-established scientists, has to be published in standard journals (whose club of editorial committees keep out really new ideas), has to be accepted by the governing bodies of the traditional medical profession, and, of course, must be double-blind.

Abram Hoffer (1917–2009)

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Atoll — Literature Quote from Robert Service

Atoll

The woes of men beyond my ken
Mean nothing more to me.
Behold my world, an Eden hurled
From Heaven to the Sea;
A jeweled home, in fending foam
Tempestuously tossed;
A virgin isle none dare defile,
Far-flung, forgotten, lost.

And here I dwell, where none may tell
Me tales of mortal strife;
Let millions die, immune am I,
And radiant with life.
No echo comes of evil drums,
To vex my dawns divine;
Aloof, alone I hold my throne,
And Majesty is mine.

Ghost ships pass by, and glad am I
They make no sign to me.
The green corn springs, the gilt vine clings,
The net is in the sea.
My paradise around me lies,
Remote from wrath and wrong;
My isle is clean, unsought, unseen,
And innocent with song.

Here let me dwell in beauty’s spell,
As tranquil as a tree;
Here let me bide, where wind and tide
Bourdon that I am free;
Here let me know from human woe
The rapture of release:
The rich caress of Loveliness,
The plenitude of Peace.

Robert Service (1874 – 1958)

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Schizophrenia is Pellagra — Abram Hoffer Quote

Schizophrenic disorders are characterized by perceptual changes (hallucinations) and thought disorder (delusions). These are pellagra syndromes, including Huntington’s disease, some Parkinsonism patients, schizoaffective patients, and LSD induced psychosis. I consider these conditions variants of pellagra. Schizoaffective patients have mood swings, and during their manic states will also have schizophrenic symptoms. These pellagra variants are responsive to vitamin B3 when adequate doses are used. They will not respond to small doses or to other nutrients. They are B3 dependent conditions, and should not be considered as deficiency diseases.
—ABRAM HOFFER, M.D., PH.D.

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Ageing and Age – Peter A. O’Connor Quote

Death is the inevitable outcome of life, but ageing is a stage or phase of life, not an outcome. This failure to differentiate between ageing and age indicates a regression to concrete literal thinking. This kind of literal, concrete thinking is invariably the sign of an underlying anxiety, and it suggests a failure to be aware of the feelings that may lie behind, or beneath the concretisation. Such a lack of awareness results in poor differentiation of the process of ageing, or indeed any experience, and the end result is a simplistic, stereotyped perception that denies ambiguity and complexity. Thus age comes to equal frailty, sicness and death, not also wisdom, freedom and an opportunity for continuing development.

Peter A. O’Connor: Facing the Fifties: From Denial to Reflection. Allen & Unwin, 2000.

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​Sancho Panza’s Proverbs – Sanchismos – Don Quixote Quotes

There’s a remedy for everything except death.

Holding the power and the staff, I’ll do whatever I want.

They’ll come for wool and go back shorn.

The lucky man has nothing to worry about.

The foolish remarks of the rich man pass for wisdom in the world.

Make yourself into honey and the flies will eat you up.

You’re worth as much as you have.

You can’t take vengeance on the landed gentry.

Never put your thumbs between your wisdom teeth.

To ‘leave my home’ and ‘what do you want with my wife?’ there’s nothing to answer.

If the pitcher hits the stone or the stone hits the pitcher, it’s bad for the pitcher.

The dead woman was frightened to see another with a slit throat.

The fool knows more in his own house than the wise man in someone else’s.

When they’re asleep, everyone is the same—the grandees and the little folk, the rich and the poor.

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra: Don Quixote (1605 and 1615

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Watch “How Real Is Fake News? | Sharyl Attkisson | TEDxUniversityofNevada” on YouTube

Investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson talking about who started the whole ‘fake news’ saga. (Hint: it’s Obama.)

He insisted in a speech that he too thought somebody needed to step in and curate information of this wild, wild West media environment. Nobody in the public had been clamoring for any such thing, yet suddenly the topic of fake news dominates headlines on a daily basis.

It’s as if the media had been given its marching orders. Fake news they insisted was an imminent threat to American democracy.

But as somebody who studied the industry that seeks to manipulate all of us on behalf of paid interests, I know that few themes arise in our environment organically.

A noted propagandist told me, “It’s like a movie,” he said, and it gave me chills at the time.

“Nearly every scene or image that crosses our path in daily life,” he said, “was put there for a reason. Often by someone who paid a lot of money to place it there.”

What if the whole anti-fake news campaign was an effort on somebody’s part to keep us from seeing or believing certain websites or stories by controversializing them or labeling them as fake news?

Don Quixote on Translations – Miguel de Cervantes (Quote)

Still it seems to me that translation from one language into another, if it be not from the queens of languages, the Greek and the Latin, is like looking at Flemish tapestries on the wrong side; for though the figures are visible, they are full of threads that make them indistinct, and they do not show with the smoothness and brightness of the right side; and translation from easy languages argues neither ingenuity nor command of words, any more than transcribing or copying out one document from another. But I do not mean by this to draw the inference that no credit is to be allowed for the work of translating, for a man may employ himself in ways worse and less profitable to himself. This estimate does not include two famous translators, Doctor Cristobal de Figueroa, in his Pastor Fido, and Don Juan de Jauregui, in his Aminta, wherein by their felicity they leave it in doubt which is the translation and which the original.

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra: Don Quixote

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When the Almond Tree Blossoms – Ecclesiastes (Bible Quote)

Remember also your Creator in the days of your youth, before the evil days come and the years draw near of which you will say, “I have no pleasure in them”; before the sun and the light and the moon and the stars are darkened and the clouds return after the rain, in the day when the keepers of the house tremble, and the strong men are bent, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those who look through the windows are dimmed, and the doors on the street are shut—when the sound of the grinding is low, and one rises up at the sound of a bird, and all the daughters of song are brought low— they are afraid also of what is high, and terrors are in the way; the almond tree blossoms, the grasshopper drags itself along, and desire fails, because man is going to his eternal home, and the mourners go about the streets— before the silver cord is snapped, or the golden bowl is broken, or the pitcher is shattered at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern, and the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God who gave it. Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher; all is vanity.

The Bible: Ecclesiastes 12:1‭-‬8 ESV

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Barnacle Geese Born from Barnacles – Giraldus Cambrensis (Quote)

Nature produces [Bernacae] against Nature in the most extraordinary way. They are like marsh geese but somewhat smaller. They are produced from fir timber tossed along the sea, and are at first like gum. Afterwards they hang down by their beaks as if they were a seaweed attached to the timber, and are surrounded by shells in order to grow more freely. Having thus in process of time been clothed with a strong coat of feathers, they either fall into the water or fly freely away into the air. They derived their food and growth from the sap of the wood or from the sea, by a secret and most wonderful process of alimentation. I have frequently seen, with my own eyes, more than a thousand of these small bodies of birds, hanging down on the sea-shore from one piece of timber, enclosed in their shells, and already formed. They do not breed and lay eggs like other birds, nor do they ever hatch any eggs, nor do they seem to build nests in any corner of the earth.

Giraldus Cambrensis: Topographica Hibernica (1186)

It Must Be Good to Be Old – Rilke (Quote)

And you have nobody and nothing, and you travel through the world with a trunk and a carton of books and truly without curiosity. What kind of life is this: without a house, without inherited Things, without dogs. If at least you had memories. But who has them? If childhood were there: it is as though it had been buried. Perhaps you must be old before you can reach all that. I think it must be good to be old.

Rainer Maria Rilke: The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge. Translated by Stephen Mitchell.

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I Don’t Want To Write Letters – Rilke (Quote)

Portrait of Rainer Maria Rilke by Leonid Pasternak

[Portrait of Rainer Maria Rilke by Leonid Pasternak]

And I don’t want to write anymore letters. What’s the use of telling someone I’m changing? If I’m no longer who I was; and if I’m something else, it’s obvious that I have no acquaintances. And I can’t possibly write to strangers.

Rainer Maria Rilke: The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge. Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Town and Country – William Cowper (Poetry Quote)

God made the country, and man made the town.
What wonder then that health and virtue, gifts
That can alone make sweet the bitter draught
That life holds out to all, should most abound
And least be threaten’d in the fields and groves?
Possess ye, therefore, ye, who, borne about
In chariots and sedans, know no fatigue
But that of idleness, and taste no scenes
But such as art contrives, possess ye still
Your element; there only can ye shine;
There only mind’s like yours can do no harm.
Our groves were planted to console at noon
The pensive wanderer in their shades. At eve
The moonbeam, sliding softly in between
The sleeping leaves, is all the light they wish,
Birds warbling all the music. We can spare
The splendour of your lamps; they but eclipse
Our softer satellite. Your songs confound
Our more harmonious notes: the thrush departs
Scar’d, and th’ offended nightingale is mute.
There is a public mischief in your mirth;
It plagues your country. Folly such as yours,
Grac’d with a sword, and worthier of a fan,
Has made, which enemies could ne’er have done,
Our arch of empire, steadfast but for you,
A mutilated structure, soon to fall.

William Cowper (1731-1800)

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Human Stupidity — Christopher Hitchens (Quote)

When I read of the possible annihilation of the elephant or the whale or the pouring of oven cleaner or cosmetics into the eyes of live kittens or the close confinement of pigs and calves in lightless pens I feel myself confronted by human stupidity which I recognise as an enemy. The connection between stupidity and cruelty is a close one.

Christopher Hitchens

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English translation of Schubert’s Winterreise, poems by W Muller

English translation of Schubert’s Die Winterreise (1821-1822)

Theory of Music

Schubert’s Wanderers consists of English translations of the poems of Franz Schubert’s Die Winterreise and Die schöne Müllerin and the German texts as set by Schubert.  The German texts are taken from Series 20 (Leider und Gesänge) of Franz Schubert’s Werke, Kritisch durchgesehene Gesammtausgabe, Brietkopf & Härtel, Leipzig, 1895.

Schubert’s Wanderers includes a Creative Commons Licence which entitles the purchaser of this book to use and adapt the translations and synopses in any context and in any media, commercial or noncommercial.  The German texts are in the public domain.

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About the author

Barry Mitchell was born in Belfast in 1958.  He studied music at Queen’s University Belfast where after completing a first degree he studied for an MA in composition.  He is also a graduate of The Open University. He has taught music for several colleges and universities in the UK including The Open University and…

View original post 3,153 more words

The most foolish mistake – Adolph Hitler (Quote)

“The most foolish mistake we could possibly make would be to allow the subjected people to carry arms. History shows that all conquerors who have allowed their subjected peoples to carry arms have prepared their own downfall by so doing. Indeed, I would go so far as to say that the underdog is a sine qua non for the overthrow of any sovereignty. So let’s not have any native militia or police.”

– Adolph Hitler, Edict of March 18, 1938

When Less is More – And When It’s Not (Quote)

Knowing when less is more – and when it is not – is more important for consistent success in participatory outdoor photography than in traditional journalistic or documentary coverage. When an artist is actively involved in an interpretive experience, whether it be climbing Everest or walking through a field, too much equipment interrupts the flow of emotional response that is the human element communicated in the best nature photography. Yes, little things do mean a lot.

Galen Rowell’s Inner Game of Outdoor Photography (2001), p. 89

Simplify Your Sentences to Write More Pithily 


1. Instead of starting a sentence with “there are” or “there is”, start it with the subject.

In most cases, simply sweep the expletive away and begin with a subject, as in revision of “There are other steps a company can take before an economic downturn to protect against its impact” to “A company can take other steps before an economic downturn to protect against its impact.”


2. Turn adjectival phrases into adverbs

Adjectival phrases are common in business jargon: on a daily basis; in a timely manner.

Replace with daily and promptly. The meaning is the same.
3. Refrain from using adjectives

These often bring no new meaning to the sentence.

 We are currently accepting applications

equals

we are accepting applications.

These shirts come in seven different colors

equals

These shirts come in seven colors

*

From “3 Easy Ways to Write More Concisely”

By Mark Nichol

httpss://www.dailywritingtips.com/3-easy-ways-to-write-more-concisely/

Class and Race Profiling in the Vaccine Culture War

Class and Race Profiling in the Vaccine Culture War

Article by a guest writer on mercola.com.

My comment: This is not just a cultural war. In a very real sense, vaccination issue is a war for survival.

Story at-a-glance

  • Elite members of the highest paid professions use academic journals and mainstream media to openly preach fear, hate, prejudice and discrimination against people who disagree with them about vaccination
  • Recent editorials have called for violence against and even death sentences for parents who opt not to follow the recommended vaccination schedule. Racial profiling is also blatantly employed
  • Class and race baiting has no place in the public conversation about vaccination and there should be no safe harbor for those who engage in it. Until laws limit the authority of doctors to violate human rights, your health and freedom are at risk
  • Ecotherapy

    Spending time outdoors can significantly lift your mood, and outdoors activities such as gardening and nature hikes have been found to be good therapy

    Americans spend 80 to 99 percent of their lives indoors — a trend that has led to “nature deficit disorder,” a term used to describe a lifestyle deficit that contributes to poor psychological and physical health

    Ecotherapy employs methods that cultivate the health benefits of being in nature. Research shows nature therapy lowers anxiety and depression, improves self-esteem, reduces blood pressure and more

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/13/ecotherapy.aspx

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    Australia online a faraway and hard-to-reach place – theage.com.au

    Australia online a faraway and hard-to-reach place

    By DAVID WALKER
    May 14 2002
    Next

    Geoffrey Blainey wrote insightfully and famously that Australia suffered from the tyranny of distance. In this digital age you can still be sure that Australia suffers from the tyranny of smallness. And nowhere is this more obvious than in the realm of online content production and management.

    The Web has given Australia an opportunity to define the country all over again, to tell its stories and show its achievements, its potential, its unsolved problems. Yet the Australia depicted on the 2002 Internet remains mostly a sparse and barren place, dominated by a peculiar combination of today’s headlines, last year’s government and academic documents, and images of koalas and the Opera House.

    Type ”Australia” into a search engine and you quickly see why more than three-quarters of Australians’ Web content is hauled across the Pacific from the US.

    Outside a few fields, we simply don’t have much online editorial content. A handful of sites can claim to represent and support Australia online.

    The two main newspaper groups and the Nine Network boast extensive news and current-affairs coverage, though little of it is profitable. Former journalist Stephen Mayne rakes muck entertainingly at crikey.com.au, John Tranter publishes the arts online in Jacket (jacketmagazine.com), noted economist Peter Jonson presides over a site full of political and investment analysis at henrythornton.com and onlineopinion.com.au publishes the thoughts of political figures.

    Niches such as sport and information technology attract clubs and self-publishers. Governments provide some of the richest resources, offering parliamentary debates and reports online. And the ABC’s under-funded New Media division displays an impressive range of content, old and new.

    But other fields from history to ecology to literature are thinly represented on the Australian Internet. A citizen of the US, one of 287 million people at the centre of the online universe, has much more to choose from than an Australian.

    And Australian content shows no sign of burgeoning any time soon. The large traditional players may be short on profitability but the new entrants have found no better formula. As Screen Producers Association president Nick Murray put it at a new-media seminar organised by RMIT University’s Network Insight group in late 2001: ”There is no revenue model” for much existing online content production in Australia. As Murray points out, local new-media content battles even to make the audience aware of its existence.

    Telstra is this year doling out $50 million for new broadband content. Yet in truth Australia does not have a broadband content problem. It has an Internet content problem, pure and simple.

    From: http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/05/10/1021002394606.html